christian-booksAlthough I am an eager follower of Jesus, I can’t say I’ve been enthralled by much Christian fiction. Most of it feels either too preachy and prissy or too edgy for me. I’m looking for books where the characters live their faith naturally, and I come away feeling uplifted regardless of the sub-genre. These indie authors, though, have been able to move me to a greater desire to follow the Lord.

 

The Hotline Girl by R. J. Conte

Arabella Rose is the county’s best suicide hotline telephone operator. But very few know the personal reasons behind her passion, until a call from a strangely compelling man shakes up her entire world.

Avalon: An Allegory by Valerie Howard

Treasonous young Mara has been sentenced to hard labor in the slave yard before her certain death by lashings. Hatred for King Aldus of Avalon drives her every action until one day when Prince Justinius personally offers her an ultimatum. Will Mara chose to befriend her sworn enemies to spare her life? Or will she side with the rebels and die in her fierce pride?

Carry Me Home by Valerie Howard

As a nurse who has experienced the pain of personal loss, Amanda strives to provide flawless medical care to the neediest of patients. But when her life starts crumbling and she meets her most stubborn patient yet, will sheer determination be enough to see her through? Or should she start wishing for a miracle from a God she doesn’t believe in?

The Bark of the Covenant by Vicky Kaseorg

A lonely, discouraged woman is beckoned to a small town to care for her dying, despicable father. At the same time, the town is reeling from the first murder in a hundred years, devastating their peaceful community. In this inspiring story of redemption, a pack of wild dogs of an ancient and rare breed bring about healing, and a surprising solution to the murder mystery. A book for dog lovers, God lovers, and mystery lovers alike, with a hint of romance for everyone else.

The Forever Stone by Gloria Repp

“Don’t bury yourself in that wilderness!” her relatives say. “Even though you’re a widow, you’re still young.”

No matter what they think, Madeleine decides to go. She’ll help her aunt restore the old house; she’ll sign up for an online baking course; and she’ll bury—yes, bury—those terrible memories. “From now on,” she tells herself, “I’m going to be strong and independent.”

Her plan seems to be working, except for the panic attacks, until she has to deflect the attentions of two men.

The doctor, who has a fire-scarred past, is not upset by her panic attacks and knows he can help her to heal. The writer, who conceals more than one secret, admires her spirit and is certain that she needs him.

God uses both men and her father’s gift of a floral paperweight to remind her of His enduring “forever love,” and as she yields to Him, she finds the courage to take a new and challenging path.